Killer at Large: Why Obesity is America’s Greatest Threat

This film focuses on the ever-expanding obesity epidemic and what we could be doing to combat this silent threat. Topics discussed include the school lunch program and government policies that are causing continuing health and weight issues. You will see the story of a 12 year old girl who undergoes liposuction to try to fix her weight issue, showing the disturbing rise in drastic weight-loss measures in younger patients. Includes interviews with public figures, authors, and experts including Bill Clinton, Ralph Nader, and Michael Pollan.

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Death By Fudgy Date Balls

This is a delicious no-guilt treat you can indulge in when sugar cravings strike.  There is no added sugar or other sweeteners – just nutritious real food!  I love, Love, LOVE these!  They do take a little bit of time to make, but trust me – it is SO worth it.  My husband thinks they look festive, so I decided I will be making these to share at Christmas time!  🙂  Multiply the recipe to make more for parties or just to store some extra in the freezer!

3/4 cup raw pitted Medjool dates
1/3 cup coconut oil
1/4 cup raw sunflower seeds
1/4 cup hemp hearts
1/4 cup cacao powder
1/4 cup gojiberries
1/4 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
1 tbsp chia seeds
1 tsp cinnamon
approx 1/2 cup additional unsweetened shredded coconut for coating

Soak dates and goji berries in warm water for 10-15 minutes to soften. Add all ingredients into food processor and process until dates are all chopped and mixture is even.

Transfer mixture to bowl, then pour the additional 1/2 cup of coconut onto a plate. Scoop out spoonfuls of the mixture and roll into about 1″ diameter ball and roll in coconut to coat. Add more coconut to plate for rolling as needed.  Chill in the refrigerator for a few hours before serving.

Makes about 16 date balls.

Enjoy!

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I <3 My CSA!

Well, this summer I finally did it – I joined a CSA. CSA stands for Community Supported Agriculture, and as a member you commit to supporting a local farm for the season, in sickness and in health. This means if they have a plentiful growing season, you reap the benefits in an abundance of fresh, local, beautiful (and organic if you choose an organic farm!) nutrient rich produce. And if the season is more troublesome (flooding, droughts, etc.) then you may not see as much produce that season.

The purpose of joining a CSA is not only to support your local farmers, but also to provide them a guaranteed income to free them from the added stresses of a constant need to sell and let them focus on growing and harvesting the best produce they can. It’s a wonderful thing to get weekly updates with information on the upcoming harvests and the progress of the new crops and to know where your food is coming from.

Each week I pick up my box of produce, which has been jam-packed lately as we are in the peak of the season, and I am astonished by all of the beautiful veggies (and occasional fruit) that I find inside as I unpack it – it covers my kitchen counter! Veggies have taken over the refrigerator and I have had a wonderful time experimenting with veggies I have never tried before. Fennel, asian eggplant, radishes, and kholrabi are now some of my new favorites – I know it’s crazy, but no, I had never tried a radish until this summer! The tomatoes taste like the ones I remember from childhood, and the melons are so fresh and delicious!! I could really go on and on…

So needless to say, I am a convert. I have already signed up for my winter share and I’m looking forward to some new items to try in the winter crops. I highly recommend joining a CSA in your area. It will make you feel connected with your local farmers and inspire you to try new healthy delicious dishes!

If you live in the Twin Cities area and would like to learn more about the CSA I joined, Featherstone Farm, you can visit their website for more info: http://www.featherstonefarm.com/

Or check out this website to find a CSA in your area: http://www.localharvest.org/csa/

Here are a couple pictures from earlier in the season – the last few boxes have been even fuller!

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King Corn

In this informative film 2 college graduates move to Iowa to plant and grow an acre of corn and try to trace it from its origins to where it ends up in the food chain to help them understand how analysis of the carbon in their hair shows corn as the major source. Through their experience we get a behind the scenes view of the production cycle, from the purchase of GMO seeds, through the growing cycle with plentiful use of potent herbicides, to the harvesting and sale of their crop. As they learn the ins and outs of subsidies and supply and demand they also learn how this grain is so widely produced and used for a variety of products, from a multitude of food additives to ethanol to livestock feed, that is virtually impossible to trace from source to end product.

View the trailer at this website: http://www.kingcorn.net/

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Autumn Veggies with Butternut Squash

This is a wonderful veggie dish for a cool fall night. The colors of the veggies remind me of fall, and the squash gives the dish a bit more substance. Makes great leftovers too!

1 med butternut squash
1 tbsp olive oil

1 tbsp coconut oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 white onion, diced
1 cup broccoli florets
1 orange bell pepper, diced
1 green bell pepper, diced
1/4 red cabbage, sliced
1 asian eggplant, cut in half and sliced
8 oz white mushrooms, quartered
2 tbsp coconut aminos
1/2 tsp coriander
fresh ground pepper
pinch of sea salt

Pre-heat oven to 375. Cut butternut squash in half and scoop out seeds. Place face up in pan and coat flesh with olive oil. Bake for 50-60 minutes, until flesh is tender and easily pierced by a fork. Let squash cool as you prepare remaining veggies.

In a large skillet heat coconut oil on medium. Add minced garlic and onions and cook for a few minutes while you are dicing the peppers. Add broccoli florets and bell peppers and stir. Slice up cabbage and add to pan and stir. Cut up asian eggplant and add to pan and stir, then dice mushrooms and add to pan, stir again. Next add coconut animos, coriander, salt and pepper and stir well to distribute seasoning.

The butternut squash should now be cool enough to handle. Make cuts into the flesh lengthwise about 1/2″ apart, but do not cut all the way through. Use a spoon to scoop out the flesh and add it to the skillet with the other veggies. Once you have scooped out all of the flesh stir the veggies and the cook for a few more minutes.

Makes 2-3 servings.

Enjoy!

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